More than half of police killings are mislabeled, new U.S. study says

Black Lives Matter (BLM) No Racism Notessource: New York Times
published: 30 September 2021

Police killings in America have been undercounted by more than half over the past four decades, according to a new study that raises pointed questions about racial bias among medical examiners and highlights the lack of reliable national record keeping on what has become a major public health and civil rights issue.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Washington and published on Thursday in The Lancet, a major British medical journal, amounts to one of the most comprehensive looks at the scope of police violence in America, and the disproportionate impact on Black people.

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Deaths in custody: Australian mother takes fight to the UN

David Dungay

source: BBC News
published:10 June 2021

Australian mother Leetona Dungay and a team of high-profile lawyers will take a claim over her son’s death in custody to the United Nations. Indigenous man David Dungay Jr died after being restrained by five prison officers in a Sydney cell in 2015.

The complaint argues Australia violated his human rights and failed to protect his life. The legal team is also seeking to put pressure on the government over its record on Indigenous deaths in custody. Aboriginal people have the highest rate of incarceration of any group in the world.

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UK government drops bid to shield soldiers from war crimes prosecutions

Soldier Hidden In Forestsource: Middle East Eye
published: 27 July 2021

The UK government has abandoned attempts to shield members of its armed forces from prosecution for murder and war crimes committed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Ministers agreed to amend its deeply controversial Overseas Operations Bill following stiff opposition from members of parliament’s upper house, the Lords.

The initial proposal – to shield soldiers from prosecution for torture or genocide as well as murder and war crimes – had also faced condemnation by human rights groups and retired senior officers. This does not mean that soldiers and ex-soldiers will be prosecuted, however.

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