The government is accused of a ‘cover up’ behind Grenfell fire

Office Files Bindersource: Socialist Worker
published: 8 December 2021

The inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire that killed 72 people in 2017 has heard the government carried out a “deliberate cover-up” over the dangers from combustible materials.

The final stage of the public inquiry is now looking at the role of government figures and what happened around building regulations. Combustible materials used for housing were not scrutinised as a result of decades of deregulation.

Stephanie Barwise QC said Grenfell was the result of the government’s “unbridled passion for deregulation” and a “prolonged period of concealment”. Michael Mansfield QC, representing some of the bereaved and survivors, said the government [simply] saw health and safety laws “as an obstruction to businesses”.

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Adolph Grimes: New Orleans NOPD goes to trial for civil rights violations

Adolph Grimes - trajectory of officer bullets
Image Credit GMC http://www.glennmcgovern.com

source/credits: The Law Office of Glenn C. McGovern
published: 5 July 2021

A civil jury trial date has officially been set on August 2, 2021,for the January 1, 2009, police shooting 82 40 caliber low trajectory angle shots into Adolph Grimes III body. NOPD plain clothes officer killed Grimes, in violation of 42 U.S.C. Section 1983 Civil Rights Act wrongful death case of Adolph Grimes III. The civil jury civil rights trial is set for August 2, 2021, in the Eastern District Court Federal Courthouse in New Orleans.

Of the 27 instances between January 2009 and May 2010 in which NOPD officers intentionally discharged their firearms at people, all 27 of the subjects of this deadly force were African American.

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UK government drops bid to shield soldiers from war crimes prosecutions

Soldier Hidden In Forestsource: Middle East Eye
published: 27 July 2021

The UK government has abandoned attempts to shield members of its armed forces from prosecution for murder and war crimes committed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Ministers agreed to amend its deeply controversial Overseas Operations Bill following stiff opposition from members of parliament’s upper house, the Lords.

The initial proposal – to shield soldiers from prosecution for torture or genocide as well as murder and war crimes – had also faced condemnation by human rights groups and retired senior officers. This does not mean that soldiers and ex-soldiers will be prosecuted, however.

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